Mosque Cathederal  of Cardoba, Spain

The Great Mosque of Cordoba, also famous as Mezquita-Catedral, It is one of the ancient edifices standing from the time Muslims ruled Al-Andalus, Spain in the Eight Century. Cordoba is a two-hour journey from Madrid, and attracts visitors from across the globe.

The structures on this site are difficult to discriminate because of the vibrant history they represent. Chroniclers think that there had a temple initially of the Roman god, Janus. The temple then converted into a church. After that, the church converted into a mosque. Umayyads—the first Islamic dynasty who had initially been governed from their capital, Damascus from 661 till 750.

Mosque

Abbasids, the second dynasty of Muslim Rulers, overthrow the family of the Umayyad, Prince Abd al-Rahman I flew to south Hispania, Where He stabilised authority of power almost all of the Iberian Peninsula and endeavoured to recreate the glory of Damascus, Cordoba. He made extensive construction programs and encouraged agriculture.

Here is a misconception that the mihrab in this mosque does not go towards the direction of Makkah but Damascus. Some people say that this is the decorative part of the mosque. The simple answer is that the Muslims has advanced in geometry to determine Kaaba correctly, So it can not be a mistake.
The Great Mosque of Cordoba, Hispania

The Great Mosque of Cordoba is comprised of a large prayer hall, a fountain in the middle of the courtyard. The open prayer hall looks expanded by its expanded design.A mihrab used in a mosque to the point faces towards Makkah, Saudi Arabia. Muslims face Makkah during their daily prayers (Salah). The Mihrab is in the great Mosque of Cordoba,shows the old glory of Muslim empires, gone dynasty to the dynasty. A beautiful dome is above the Mihrab. The design of this extraordinary structure indicates later Gothic rib vaulting. The Great Mosque of Cordoba is an excellent illustration of the Muslim world's knowledge to develop architectural styles based on pre-existing regional traditions brilliantly.

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